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Patient Test Library
  • Breast Cancer
    Breast cancers are malignant tumors that arise from the uncontrolled growth of cells in the breast. Occurring primarily in the ducts that transport milk to the nipple during lactation (breast feeding), and secondarily in the lobules the glands that produce milk, breast cancers are distinct from cancers that may spread to the breasts from other parts of the body.
  • G-6 PD
    Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency (G6PDD) is an inherited, sex-linked, metabolic disorder characterized by an enzyme defect that leads to the breakdown of red blood cells (hemolysis) upon exposure to stresses associated with some bacterial infections or certain drugs. A deficiency of this enzyme may result in the premature destruction of red blood cells (an acute hemolytic anemia).
  • Hepatitis B Virus
    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) tests check for substances in the blood that show whether a hepatitis B infection is active or has occurred in the past. The tests look for different signs of infection
  • Herpes
    Herpes tests are done to find the herpes simplex virus (HSV). An HSV infection can cause small, painful sores that look like blisters on the skin or the tissue lining (mucous membranes) of the throat, nose, mouth, urethra, rectum, and vagina. A herpes infection may cause only a single outbreak of sores, but in many cases the person will have more outbreaks.
  • Human Immunodefiency Virus (HIV) Infection
    What is HIV? What is AIDS?
    HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a virus that attacks the immune system, the body's natural defense system. Without a strong immune system, the body has trouble fighting off disease. Both the virus and the infection it causes are called HIV.
  • Karyotype Test
    Karyotype is a test to identify and evaluate the size, shape, and number of chromosomes in a sample of body cells. Extra, missing, or abnormal positions of chromosome pieces can cause problems with a person's growth, development, and body functions.
  • Kidney Biopsy
    The two kidneys {IMAGE LINK 1} are found on either side of the spine, in the lower back. They help the body balance water, salts, and minerals in the blood. The kidneys also filter waste products from the blood and make urine.
  • LDL SUBFRACTIONS
    The presence of low molecular weight low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles in plasma has been associated with premature coronary artery disease. The health risk is much clearer when you understand that low density lipoproteins (LDL) carry about 70% of the blood's cholesterol.
  • Lead
    This test measures the amount of lead in the blood. Lead is a poisonous (toxic) metal that can damage the brain and other parts of the body. A lead blood test may be done on blood drawn from the vein, a finger (finger stick), or the heel (heel stick).
  • Progesterone
    A progesterone test measures the amount of the hormone progesterone in a blood sample. Progesterone is a female hormone produced by the ovaries during release of a mature egg from an ovary (ovulation).
  • SWINE FLU
    Swine influenza (also called swine flu, hog flu, and pig flu) is an infection by any one of several types of swine influenza virus. Swine influenza virus (SIV) is any strain of the influenza family of viruses that is endemic in pigs. As of 2009, the known SIV strains include influenza C and the subtypes of influenza A known as H1N1, H1N2, H3N1, H3N2, and H2N3.
  • Tissue Type Test (HLA)
    A tissue type test is a blood test that measures substances called antigens on the surface of body cells and tissues. Checking the antigens can tell if donor tissue is safe (compatible) for transplant to another person. This test may also be called HLA typing. Antigens can tell the difference between normal body tissue or foreign tissue (for example, tissue from another person's body). Tissue type helps find the best match for tissues or blood cells (such as platelets). Some times tissue type test is done to check the autoimmune diseases.
  • Tuberculosis (TB)
    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection caused by slow-growing bacteria that grow best in areas of the body that have lots of blood and oxygen. That's why it is most often found in the lungs {Image Link1}. This is called pulmonary TB. But TB can also spread to other parts of the body, which is called extrapulmonary TB. Treatment is often a success, but it is a long process. It takes about 6 to 9 months to treat TB.
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*Only Pathology reports available online. For X-Ray, Ultrasound, ECG, TMT, Echo, PFT, Uroflowmetry reports,
please visit the concerned centre where test has been conducted.
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